HUMANITARAIN PROJECT

BUSINESS PLAN

GOD’S SHELTERS

CHEVEZ MADRID MOORE

JULY 20, 2015

Executive Summary

Introduction
GOD’S SHELTHER MONOLITHIC DOME CONSTRUCTION COMPANY plans to become the leading provider of concrete monolithic dome homes and community shelter centers housing services in the United States. This means always having the best and most efficient homes, facilities, processes, and people. To achieve this, monolithic domes construction company is investing in many ways that will pay off in competitive advantages for its customers.

The company’s overall strategy will be based on a continuing improvement process of setting objectives, measuring results, and providing feedback to facilitate further growth and progress.

GOD’S SHELTHER MONOLITHIC DOME CONSTRUCTION COMPANY will be a Limited Liability company, with principal offices located in all 52 states- nationwide. The management is highly experienced and qualified. Chevez Moore, MS. leads the management team with a Master’s Degree in management and organizational leadership.

GOD’S SHELTHERS is a start-up not for profit Monolothic Dome Construction Company serving the greater green society Eco Cities/Communities in the United States with sustainable dome homes. These domed homes and shelters will provide options not afforded with today’s current emergency or temporary shelthers/housing for people living in provety, victims of abuse or homlessness. Monolithic Domes are a cost effective way to end homlessness in America. Monolithic Domes put a roof of hope over homlessness, and are a departure from traditional shelthers.

GOD’S SHELTHERS is an innovative approach to communities intractable homeless problem. Dome homes and communitie shelthers are moving beyond the box for homeless to homeownership. The communities will be self- goverend, self-sufficient, self sustainable transitional and permanat living rental housing and shelter centers. While participating in counseling, jobs training and careere assistance, residents stay sober until other housing becomes available. The goal once there, is to stabilize the women, children, men, then move them into permanate dome rental homes as soon as possible.

Company Overview

GOD SHELTHER Monolithic Dome Construction Company was conceived by the owner Chevez Moore in 2015 after she became involed in emergency housing and shelters for victims of abuse. There was never enough housing for the clients. Chevez was homeless herself, due to domestic abuse, and found there was never enough funding for housing or shelter which left her feeling hopeless and helpless. Chevez’s solution to the problem was to buy land in 52 states where her shelters/homes communities were needed, and build them herself. Chevez wanted to make sure no one was left out on the streets and put in harms way, and hoped that one day, with the support of our communities, that she could change the face of our society and end homelessness.

Monolithic dome construction utilizes concrete, rebar, and spray insulation, often with an oversize balloon is as a form. Monolithic domes are inherently strong, and resistant to earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and even bombs.

Dome Living offers a great look at the uncommon architecture of monolithic dome homes. Monolithic domes are made using large balloon like air forms. The air forms are usually sprayed on the inside with a seamless coating of polyurethane insulation. A grid of reinforcing rebar is put up inside of that, and sprayed with a thin layer of shotcrete to make a shelter that is incredibly energy efficient and highly resistant to natural or manmade disasters. The energy bill for a typical monolithic dome home is about 10% of the bill for a conventional house of similar size. Dome structures have proved impressively resiliant against earthquakes, tornadoes–even dropping bombs. While dome homes may not fit into every neighborhood, the reality is that if all houses were built like monolithic dome homes, then we would have very nearly achieved a sustainble (energy- and resource-efficeint) civilization already. Dome Living includes more than 115 house plans to give you lots of creative ideas to work with in planning your own monolithic dome home.

For many low-income families, the rental housing affordability crisis is like a game of musical chairs in which there is never a chair left for them,( Research Director at the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies). Monolithic Domes rentals will now be available!

Mission

The mission of Monolithic Dome Construction Company is to provide quality service at competitive pricing.

MISSION STATEMENT

To improve the lives of people through the introduction and construction of EcoShells and Monolithic Domes for personal and public use.

Mission

GOD’S SHELTHER Housing’s mission is to construct Eco Shells, Monolithic Dome rental homes, and homeless Shelter Center Communities to needy, homeless,abused women, children, and men of America. Construct safe transitional emergency housing alternative, teach a multitude of skills to empower them to self-sufficiency, and facilitate the possible reunification of clients with their children/families,

VISION STATEMENT

Vision

The Monolithic Domes Construction Company will help end homelessness, and support people all over United States to have a decent place to spend the night as well as empower/assist those who are wanting to provide decent housing for themselves and their families.

Our Core Values

Service – To appropriately serve by helping people to help themselves.

Shelter – To foster the construction of homes and buildings and shelter centers for needy and or homeless vitims, individuals, families and communities.

Safety – To design housing structures and shelter communities centers that provide safety from natural disasters, such as earthquakes and hurricanes.

Sanitation – To build easily maintained dwellings and community shelter buildings that

resist termites, vermin, rot and mold.

Sustainability – To provide training and tools so local people can continue constructing safe structures. To use techniques and materials that are environmentally sustainable.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

  • Sustainable buildings, according to the U.S. Green Building Council, save energy, water and materials; preserve the local surroundings; assure the health of their occupants; and require little maintenance.

  • Built on private country real estate giving you the small-town environment. Most units include a bathroom with shower, basin and toilet; a kitchen with stove, refrigerator, table and chairs; a furnished sleeping area; heating and air conditioning.
  • Build as an extended stay hotel. The reason is the units are small. If you go by apartment rules they may make you make the buildings larger. So you build by motel rules. There are a huge number of advantages by going by motel rules.
  • Rental homes and shelter community centers will be in spacific locations in each state. Not only will they provide shelter, they will also provide children safe and friendly enviornments.
  • Our monolithic dome rental homes and community shelters don’t need fancy locations. The people want to be a bit out of the main traffic zone. They don’t want to be on the main highways. They want you to find a nice quiet place where they can have their units.
  • Water is the only need. We will use it from public water either from a city or a county water supply.
  • Septic system- We are going to have to be on one. We will get it hooked up to a city sewer system. Having our own septic systems is a bit more complex but certainly can be done. I have to admit I like the city water and sewer a little better but that does not keep us from building outside the city limits in most places.
  • We will have software available for keeping track of the rental business. It is simple and really keeps track of the residents and communitiy center projects.
  • These rentals are classified as residence inns. They therefore operate under motel, hotel or inn rules rather than apartment rules in the first 30 days. This classification has some important advantages. For example, renters at a residence inn can pay their rent weekly. Unlike apartments, there is a smaller demand for deposit and security fees, making it far more affordable and easier for the renter.
  • The goal is to stabilize residents and support them to self-sufficiency through skills training and home ownership.

RESOURCES, FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

Basic Equipment

Urethane foam machine

The urethane foam machine is often the first piece of equipment a newbie wants, but it is the last thing to invest in. Firstly, it’s expensive! Budget $35,000 to $50,000 for one that’s ready to go. Secondly,it must be used. If it is not used regularly, it may require high maintenance. It is not unusual to spend $5,000 to get one to work again after it has sat for six months. The foam business can be a very good business, but it is a lousy part-time thing. As a start-up get in cahoots with a local foamer.

If you do decide you want a foam rig, put it on a trailer of its own. It will mean a separate trip to the jobsite. But you do not want it on your equipment trailer as you only use it for about two days, and then it goes to the next job. If you want a foam rig you should get in the foam business.

The Pump

Startup dome builders should invest in a pump that fits what they will build. If you will be constructing domes less than 50 feet in diameter, get the smallest pump. But if you will be building domes with diameters of 50 feet or more, invest in a larger pump. For even bigger domes, consider the 2500 pump. If you are going to do very, very large domes you will need a Schwing or such.

The Monolithic GHP 1500 Concrete Pump works well for building domes with diameters of up to 50 feet and an occasional larger one. It is ideal for fine work and is robust enough for larger projects.

For example, a 50′ × 20′ Monolithic Dome requires about forty cubic yards of concrete and about fourteen hours of spray time using a GHP 1500. Fourteen hours of spray time can easily be completed in four working days. If a pump ten times larger than the GHP 1500 is used, it will still take four days, since each concrete coat requires cure time. Then too, the smaller pump is easier to handle, so it generally does a nicer job.

Monolithic no longer mounts its concrete pumps on trailers. It takes another pickup and driver to get them to the job site. Again, stay nimble. Load the pump on the trailer along with all of the other tools and use one pickup for transport workers and materials.

The Skid Steer and the Monolithic Concrete Mixer

Generally, our crews utilize a 1300-pound rated skid steer. That pound-rating is determined by the manufacturer. In reality, a skid steer can pick up substantially more weight than what its rating indicates. On the back of our 1300-pound skid steer, we set counterweights to offset the weight of the mixer. So, the beginning dome builder can consider a 1300-pound, a 1500-pound or heavier skid steer. But remember that if it is heavier, you still have to load it on the trailer and carry it. This is important – stay nimble

Your skid steer needs to be equipped with a Monolithic Concrete Mixer that’s designed to operate on the front end of a skid loader. It will mix three-tenths of a cubic yard per batch. The skid loader comes in handy for a number of other jobs as well. Using the Monolithic Concrete Mixer, two workers can mix as fast as needed for the GHP 1500.

The GHP 1500 does not work well with mixer trucks because the pump is too slow for the capacity of the truck. For maximum efficiency, we suggest having aggregate and bag cement delivered, then mixed on site. That allows you to spray on your schedule – not on a Redi Mix schedule – and your project will go more smoothly and look better.

Inflator Fans

A pair of Monolithic Inflator Fan Units provide backup for each other, are not expensive, and are easy to handle and transport. One such unit can be run off a generator and provide even more duplication and security. For larger jobs and more air flow, use the SC3 Inflator.

Scaffolding

A Monolithic Rotating Scaffold Base with a full set of double box scaffolds and planks is a simple device that makes construction safer and easier. The result is a higher quality of work, done by workers who feel safe because they know that they are safe. Best of all, it will break down and fit on the equipment trailer, so you don’t need another transport vehicle.

A Truck and Trailer

Monolithic’s crews use a Diesel-fueled, heavy duty, three-quarter ton or a one-ton crew cab. Trucks should be kept in good condition and be equipped with a sturdy trailer hitch and a braking system that activates the trailer brakes.

Monolithic uses a custom-made trailer that is 8.5 feet wide and 22 feet long. It has two 13,000-pound axles, each with brakes. These extra-heavy-duty axles are needed for rough surfaces. But we don’t necessarily put that much load on the trailer. The trailer’s sides are flat. Usually, trailer sides are not necessary, but you do need to be able to load things on and off the sides. Hence, we have no rails down the sides. We use a steel deck and a slight boat tail on the last two feet of the trailer. We also have under-trailer storage of ramps, so we can drive our equipment onto the trailer.

You must stay nimble. The truck and trailer can easily haul a 1300 skid loader, airlock, Paxis scaffold, GHP 1500 and all of the tools and pieces – everything but the urethane rig. Four or five workers can travel fast and efficiently to a job site to get a dome built as inexpensively as possible.

Miscellaneous

This includes an airlock, rebar cutters ( get a hand-held electric hydraulic unit.), rebar binder shovels, forming materials, levels, etc.

Green Buildings

People admire Monolithic Domes for many different reasons. Some like their graceful, curved lines. Others admire their open, clear-span interiors. Still others become fascinated with the technical aspects of Monolithic Dome construction. But besides those characteristics, the Monolithic Dome offers another that is vitally important today because it has to do with our environment. Monolithic Domes are green buildings – they are considered among the greenest of today’s building alternatives.

Servivability

Whether it’s your home, your children’s school or some other structure that you and your loved ones spend time in, nothing beats knowing that you’re in a place that cannot be destroyed by most natural or manmade disasters. That’s the confidence Monolithic Domes offer. They meet or exceed FEMA’s standards for providing near-absolute protection. Monolithic Domes are proven survivors of tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and fires.

Energy-Efficiency

The Monolithic Dome is a micro-energy user. It needs a minimum of energy to maintain a comfortable interior, usually one fourth of that used by other types of structures. In fact, it takes less energy to heat or cool a Monolithic Dome than it does to heat or cool a super-insulated metal building or a conventional house blanketed in an airtight wrap.

Strength

The Monolithic Dome has strength that produces longevity. Its lifespan is measured in centuries, not years. In fact, right now, we don’t know just how many centuries a Monolithic Dome will last. But we do know that it is a structure that can be designed and constructed to be passed down to and used by generations. Easy maintenance complements the dome’s longevity. In other words, a Monolithic Dome can not only last for centuries, it can last beautifully just with easy care.

SERVICES

Products/Services

Monolithic Dome Construction Company has researched sophisticated formwork solutions for some of the most complex construction projects being done today. The company’s standard form systems are versatile and completely adaptable to a variety of configurations such as monistaries, senior living villages, community shelter centers, rental homes, and circular walls.

The Concrete Installation system can be adapted to almost any construction requirement that calls for forming. The company’s expert staff has the capability to design and manufacture any custom component or accessory item that may be required to complete the formwork package.

A Monolithic Dome’s construction process saves both money and time. A dome’s interior can be planned and designed for any activity or use and with virtually any theme. The dome’s disaster-resistance usually merits lower insurance premiums.

Owners, developers, construction managers, general contractors, and concrete subcontractors have realized substantial savings in labor and material costs by using structural contours construction methods, systems and equipment. Applications include commercial and residential structures, bridges, educational projects, recreational projects, civil projects, tunnels, utility projects, environmental projects, and virtually every other type of concrete construction.

Concrete monolithic installation’s formworks will offer major advances, complete adaptability, and high strength-to-weight ratio, and all at cost effective prices. Assembly will be quick and easy. During form use, maintenance will be minimal.

Monolithic Dome Homes will recommend, as a safety precaution, occasional inspection for quality and state sanitation requirements that may have loosened from handling.

The required formwork drawings that Concrete Installation will furnish to the contractor eliminate all guesswork. The company will specify the order of assembly and erection including the location of the strongbacks and joists, the location and actual loading of the form ties, location of all accessories and advise clients of the maximum allowable rate of concrete placement.

Accident prevention is the cornerstone of Concrete Installation’s safety commitment. The company will strive to eliminate foreseeable hazards which could result in personal injury or illness; at Concrete Installation, health and safety will not be compromised. Concrete Installation will sell its services clients in the area of commercial construction.


Applications

The following applications are uses for Monolithic Dome Home services.

  • Foundations
  • Parking Lots
  • Parking Garages
  • Low Rise/Tilt-Up
  • High Rise
  • Flowable Fill/Soil Displacement
  • Retaining Walls

FEASIBILITY STUDIES:

Each study will determines several factors, including but not limited to: potential building sites; material and labor availability and procurement; soil studies; interviews and surveys with local residents and leaders; preliminary sketches and estimated project costs.

  • ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNS:

Will have access to a full staff of professionals, including architects and planners who are competent and passionate about cultural compatibility, design, aesthetics and the people of the communities they serve.

  • PROJECT PLANNING:

Will be experienced and professional in all aspects of project planning, taking each project from conceptual stage to final accounting. Realizing the importance of good relationships with local and regional leaders, strives to begin and end each project by building strong alliances with those involved.

  • TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER:

Project Supervisors diligently work to identify and train local residents to occupy key positions. Their goal: leave skilled labor, technology and materials behind to perpetuate building homes and economies.

  • TRANSPARENCY:

Will have a policy of total transparency of all accounting records. Any or all documentation are open and available for inspection at anytime. Every penny and receipt is accounted for and reported in a timely manner to the donor(s) and/or other interested parties.

  • REPORTS:

Will works diligently to provide daily, monthly and final reports detailing every phase of a project. We will use a variety of tools for reporting, including but not limited to: verbal updates, blogs, emails, photo journals and official written reports.

Monolithic and EcoShells dome homes use readily available, environment-friendly materials, so trees and other local, natural resources are conserved. Construction can be done by hiring local labor with very little special skills and/or equipment.

Floor Plans: 1 bedroom

One bedroom Monolithic dome home floor plan designs.


Floor Plan: DL-1801

615 square feet
One bedroom
One bath

Floor Plan: DL-2001

314 square feet
One bedroom
One bath

Floor Plan: DL-2002

314 square feet
One bedroom
One bath

Floor Plans: 2 bedrooms

Two bedroom Monolithic dome home floor plan designs.


Floor Plan: DL-2601

531 square feet
Two bedrooms
One bath

Floor Plan: DL-2802

616 square feet
Two bedrooms
One bath

Floor Plan: DL-3001

706 square feet
Two bedrooms
One bath

Community Shelter Programs

.

Homeless Communities
It is an endless cycle for many homeless. With no house or bath, they cannot get a job and with no job they cannot get a house. Finding affordable housing in the U.S. and many other countries has become more and more difficult. Monolithic domes offers an easy and affordable solution. Not only can one Dome house a five person family, it can also be assembled on almost any type of ground. In a designated area of a city, a complete compound of Domes can be constructed in one day. Not only will it provide shelter but it will create a communal atmosphere.

taking pride

A since of pride comes with having a community to belong to. A place to call your own gives us a feeling of comfort. Here our domes are used as a kitchen.

Working together

The communities our dome cities create can bring individuals together in a very special way. Our domes do more than provide shelter, they provide a home to the homeless.

The “Community Transition Center project — which lists its organizers as Gopman-led group A Better SF and homeless aid nonprofit Downtown Streets Team, along with architectural studio Byrens Kim Design Works — is like a 1960s Popular Science illustrator’s conception of a Martian refugee camp. It envisions a center for “highly employable” homeless residents looking to get back on their feet, providing six months’ worth of shelter, counseling, and vocational training. It can, in theory, house up to 125 people, who will either pay $250 per month in rent or work on community service projects. It is also made of domes.

“Dome sweet dome”This will include a welcome dome, a kitchen dome, a laundry dome, a computer room dome, and 100 “personal domes,” which the site promises can be set up for $599 apiece. They are referred to as “dome sweet dome.” The entire structure would theoretically cost $200,000 to build and could be set up or taken down in 30 days, so vacant land or future construction sites could be temporarily converted into futuristic dome cities.

Image: Children in Indonesia — Children enjoy their new playground at Ngelepen, an Indonesian community that DFTW partnered to rebuild after the destruction of a May 2006 earthquake.

Image: Indonesia — The dome village in New Ngelepen includes dome-homes for 71 families, clean water, a school, a masjiid and a medical clinic.

MONOLITHIC DOME CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, owners, developers, construction managers, general contractors, and concrete subcontractors have realized substantial savings in labor and material costs by using structural contours construction methods, systems and equipment. Applications include commercial and residential structures, bridges, educational projects, recreational projects, civil projects, tunnels, utility projects, environmental projects, and virtually every other type of concrete construction.

The Market
The housing industry has proceeded at a red-hot pace for several years running. An all-time record was set in 2011, when 886,000 new-site single family homes were sold. That represented a 10% gain from the robust total of 804,000 homes sold in 2012, and an 8.1% rise from the prior record of 819,000 units in 2013. Single-family housing construction accounted for $48 million of the total $125 million generated in the industry. This makes for an excellent opportunity to expand Monolithic Dome Homes and community shelter Centers operations and gain significant market share in its primary target market segment.

The company plans to rapidly develop marketing alliances with industry leaders and pursue new sales of its services to residential and commercial builders. The market strategy is to capitalize on Concrete Installation’s alliances by securing city, county, and state and federal government contracts.

Monolithic Dome Construction plans to use a direct sales force, relationship selling, and subcontractors to reach its markets. These channels are most appropriate because of time to market, reduced capital requirements, and fast access to established distribution channels.


Market Analysis Summary

Industry Statistics – Concrete Work

Special trade contractors primarily engaged in concrete work, including portland cement and asphalt.

Estimated number of U.S. establishments 30,214
Number of people employed in this industry 230,338
Total annual sales in this industry $21 million
Average employees per establishment 8
Average sales per establishment $.7 million

Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing portland cement concrete manufactured and delivered to a purchaser in a plastic and unhardened steel.

Estimated number of U.S. establishments 5,798
Number of people employed in this industry 89,662
Total annual sales in this industry $19 million
Average number of employees per establishment 17
Average sales per establishment $6.5 million


Market Segmentation

The housing industry has proceeded at a red-hot pace for several years running. An all-time record was set in 2010 when 886,000 new-site single family homes were sold. That represented a 10% gain from the robust total of 804,000 homes sold in 2011 and an 8.1% rise from the prior record of 819,000 units in 2012. Single-family housing construction accounted for $48 million of the total $125 million generated in the industry.

Home sales strengthened even further during most of 2000 first 10 months. In that period, new single-family home sales increased by 4.8% on a year-to-year basis, to 791,000 units, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Through October 2010, seasonally adjusted sales had exceeded 800,000 on an annualized basis in every month since the start of 2013.

The record setting string of home sales since the second half of 2010 has forced builders to pick up the pace of their construction activity. During 2011, total starts increased by 9.7% to 1.62 million units. Starts for single family units moved up 12 % for the year, and those of multifamily units were ahead by 1.5%. As an indication of building activity at year-end 2013 housing starts in November 2014 came in at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.6 million units.

The table below outlines the total market potential of the three targeted market segments in the served markets (in US$ thousands).


(Information provided by Standard & Poor’s)

Market Analysis

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Potential Customers

Growth

CAGR

Single-family housing construction

8% 125,000 135,000 145,800 157,464 170,061 8.00%

Residential construction

5% 25,000 26,250 27,563 28,941 30,388 5.00%


Heavy construction

5% 50,000 52,500 55,125 57,881 60,775 5.00%

Total

6.90% 200,000 213,750 228,488 244,286 261,224 6.90%


Strategy and Implementation Summary

The company plans to rapidly develop marketing alliances with industry leaders and pursue new sales of its services to residential and commercial builders. The market strategy is to capitalize on Monolithic Dome Construction Company alliances by securing city, county, and state and federal government contracts.

GOD’S SHELTHER will be committed to ensuring that the products used on its’ customers job sites, everything from access scaffolding to concrete shoring frames and forming equipment, is safe and OSHA approved. Along with clients, the company believes in a health and safety initiative that is all pervasive, managing any potential loss in the work environment.

Concrete Installation will develop sophisticated formwork solutions for some of the most complex construction projects being done today. The company’s standard form systems will be versatile and completely adaptable to a variety of configurations.

With that in mind, GOD’S SHELTHER will adopt a corporate strategy that is dedicated to improving the performance of activities on the critical path of its customers’ projects. The company will do this by building on its core strengths: innovative equipment, design engineering expertise, and project and site management, within an environment of safety excellence.

At GOD’S SHELTHER, customer service is a pro-active partnership, a relationship that ensures a professional, efficiently run, safe workplace. The company’s customer service philosophy starts at the top, is ingrained into the fabric of the company, and is closely aligned to MONOLITHIC DOME HOME CONSTRUCTION COMPANY goal of contributing to its’ customers critical success factors.

Customer service can be divided into two interrelated areas: equipment and people. On the job site, with the help of a newly integrated technology system and a well-trained staff, MONOLITHIC DOME HOMES will be able to maintain excellent control over such key areas as inventory, shipments/deliveries, damage loss, and invoicing. Troubleshooting, which customer service representatives often do right on the job site, will be handled quickly and efficiently. On the people side, MONOLITHIC DOME HOMES will provide a highly qualified and well-prepared labor force, ensuring that schedules and deadlines are met and worker safety remains a top consideration.


Financial Considerations
We expect to be profitable during the first year of operations. Despite initial large outlays in cash to promote sales, the company’s cash account is expected to remain healthy. The company expects to earn approximately 1.5 million dollars in revenue by Year 3.

Sales Forecast

The following table and charts show our projected Sales Forecast.


Sales Forecast

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Sales

All construction work

$700,000 $1,050,000 $1,575,000

Other

$0 $0 $0

Total Sales

$700,000 $1,050,000 $1,575,000

Direct Cost of Sales

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

All construction work

$448,000 $558,750 $698,437

Other

$0 $0 $0

Subtotal Direct Cost of Sales

$448,000 $558,750 $698,437


Community Transition Center

The Market

Market

When we first started building Monolithic Dome homes, we had problems marketing to middle America. That is slowly changing. High-end Monolithic Home Domes are also becoming more popular. People who are spending $500,000 to $1,000,000+ on a home often want the uniqueness a dome provides. They also want something that is extremely energy efficient and will last for the long haul.

Another market that seems very viable to me is the low-end rental and house market. This is especially true of rentals. There is a serious need for rental homes all over the United States – especially for singles and mothers with children.

I believe that builders constructing small homes for the singles’ market can make a good living. These homes, 200 to 315 square feet each, rent to singles or couples, both young and old. Lately we have been building the Oberon Four-plex. The units are 200 square feet each – a lifesaver for low income renters. The smaller units make the most money. We will not make the mistake and get caught up in what we think the public would want. Remember, it is what “they” need.

Small rentals are often built as extended stay motels. Contact local building inspectors. Become familiar with and adhere to their requirements.

So I can’t definitively say that a miniature city of solar-powered domes wouldn’t help people who are, “more than capable of working their way out of homelessness if only given the chance.” But it’s not immediately clear that building one would be better than putting $200,000 into other homeless aid projects. It’s also not clear how it will run what seems like a full public community center, including “a computer lab, co-work space, dining hall, kitchen, donation center, car share, bike share, community garden, bathrooms, lounges, laundry room, showers, and free Wi-Fi.” It’s not totally clear whether these things fill the biggest aid gaps, or if they’re even what homeless residents need. The pilot program won’t accept people with substance abuse problems or mental illness.

While the centers will provide counseling, it seems like it’s more in the “life coaching” sense than the “therapy” one, as they will “help people overcome the major mental blocks holding people back from fulfilling their potential.” The pilot program will only accept people who are “drug-free, have no history of mental illness, and who are determined to working their way out of the difficult situation they’re in,” leaving (by its measures) around 40 percent of the total homeless population. “set a standard for which homeless can be considered responsible and accountable” and make the whole population more attractive to employers.

They sell small trinkets, beg coyly, stay quiet, and generally stay out of your way. They realize it’s a privilege to be in the civilized part of town and view themselves as guests. And that’s okay.” His work (ideally) isn’t an extension of some excessively blunt truth, it’s a total about-face.

Taking 30 days to set up the entire compound, with each pod, or dome costing $599 apiece. The entire project could cost approximately $200,000. With the easy and

One of the benefits, according to the site, is that the centers are 90 percent cheaper

than “any other homeless shelter solution.” This is apparently partially because it “operates on a zero-cost basis, as our transitional workforce crowdfunds for the neighborhood betterment projects they do, all of which are requested from the community.” How is that number calculated? “When you compare the costs to build Transition Centers ($200,000) with traditional homeless shelters (many millions), the price difference is at least 90 percent,” said Gopman. “On a yearly basis, Transition Centers ($200 a month per person) costs 80 to 90 percent less, depending on which shelters numbers you look at.”

speedy construction of the domes, it means that the project could potentially use vacant building sites and abandoned public spaces as temporary sites for their ‘dome cities’.

However, a stumbling block that the project arguably faces is the stringent acceptance criteria that has been set, and the considerable rent that Gopman expects habitants to pay ($250) a month or to be able to work on community service projects.

Also the site is only seeking to provide homes for ”highly employable” homeless residents looking to get back on their feet. They’ll do this by providing six months’ worth of shelter, counseling, and vocational training. The crux is that the pilot program will only accept people who are “drug-free, have no history of mental illness, and who are determined to working their way out of the difficult situation they’re in.”

Considering that approximately 90% of those who’re  homeless in San Francisco suffer from some mental health issues, it means that Gopman’s dome city becomes a way to tackle ‘manageable’ homelessness but still leave those most in need out on the street.

While the altruistic intentions of this project are admirable, and the design concept is environmentally friendly and feasible for communities of every size, ultimately the CTC’S only seeks to help a certain type of homelessness, and its one that could probably be benefitted just as greatly by investing $200,000 in other outreach projects that would benefit the many, and not just the few.

MARKETING METHODS

GOD’S SHELTHER will initiate and coordinate efforts to alleviate shortcomings in housing and community facilities. We will negotiate partnerships with governments and organizations who share our goals. We seek grants and donations to fund construction of permanent, affordable, sanitary, and safe structures for those who have none. We train local people in our methods of construction and transfer that technology. We stimulate the local economy by providing employment and purchasing materials from local vendors.

Either way, he hopes that the domes will soon be upon us. Gopman has given us a surprisingly optimistic 60-day timeline to launch in San Francisco, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, or San Diego, with potential plots laid out in a planning document. “All we need is a large plot of land to work with and to hold a few neighborhood meetings to explain to the community what we’re doing.” According to the site, his project will also need a one-year lease and a “small investment.”

Taking 30 days to set up the entire compound, with each pod, or dome costing $599 apiece. The entire project could cost approximately $200,000. With the easy and

Web Plan Summary

The website will be used as a resource to provide information to clients, referral social service agencies, and donors. The site will be a straightforward source of information including details regarding the empowerment program, information about the facilities, and biographical information about the staff.

Website Marketing Strategy

The website will be marketed to all referral social service agencies as well as to prospective corporate and individual donors.


Development Requirements

A programmer (friend of a staff member) has been identified as someone who is willing to develop the site. There will be no labor costs associated with the website as the developmental labor will be donated.

Market Analysis Summary

GOD’S SHELTER has identified two distinct market segments of customers based on age; those who are under 30 and those who are 30 and over. The distinction is important because of the high percentage of clients with children, and those in the younger market segment having far younger children. The under 30 age group is growing annually at 9%, and the 30 and over age group growing at 8%. The two groups respectively have 165,454 and 158,745 potential clients. The overwhelming majority of clients come from lower socio-economic population groups. These segments can be difficult to communicate with, yet their use of Transitional Housing’s services would give them some profound benefits. The good news is if the people are willing to accept help from Monolithic Dome Homes and shelters are far more likely to be able to get out of the dire circumstances that they currently face.

The Dome Village is often able to assist individuals who have shunned or been unsuccessful in traditional programs for the homeless offered elsewhere.

While its true that a variety of programs for the homeless are available, most have fallen short of providing long-term impact on the problem, unable to meaningfully engage individuals in activities which can alter the course of chronic hard-core homelessness.

The Dome Villages philosophy of self-governance, responsibility, productivity, volunteerism and respect for individuals and the community right where they are, allows avenues for homeless people to seek empowerment and make a break from the chronic cycle and psyche of homelessness.


Inadequate shelter is a detriment, pulling down those living in poverty. Slum dwellers face death caused by water borne and respiratory illnesses. There is a great need to improve their living conditions. Adequate and sustainable housing is crucial in our urbanizing world. According to the UN, our world has 1.6 billion people living in substandard housing and 100 million homeless. During the next thirty years, those living in slums will increase to nearly two billion unless action is taken.

Why domes? “Domes are the most cost effective structure my team has found that offers weather resistance, lockable doors, easy set up / takedown time (two hours), and can be temperature controlled with the addition of electricity via solar panels, the domes are aesthetically pleasing to the eye, which is a big deal when placing them in neighborhoods. Tents freak people out these days.”

Management Summary

Personnel Plan

For Housing shelthers and rentals

  • Executive Director- Nonprofit management, fundraising, marketing, and other activities.
  • Associate Director- Supervise the clinical staff.
  • Trainer – In-house dependency counselor to assist clients manage their chemical and alcohol dependencies.
  • Couslors- Part-time counselor to assist clients manage their HIV positive status.
  • Resptionist- Responsible for the strategic, concerted efforts to assist clients to gain custody of their children
  • Administration Staff (2)- Responsible for administrative duties.

Board of Trustees- This board will be composed of 5different influential community leaders. The board will be used as a resource for business decisions and management as well as a source of fundraising. God’s Shelther Transitional shelthers andrental Housing recognizes the significant value that a board can offer.

Funding Forecast

The funding forecast indicates that it is expected to take six months before there are sufficient funds to to get operations rolling. With the expected opening date of month seven, initial funding will trickle in from month two to four with larger quantities arriving around months five and six.

The initial funds will be spent in preparation for the start-up, however God’s shelter construction company will need a substantial amount for the down payment of the land and equipment. Please note that the fundraising effort is not a static one time or annual event. In order to gain true operating sufficiency, God’s Shelter will need to raise funds throughout the year. Consequently, one of the main tasks of the Executive Director will be fundraising.

Costs

Using round numbers, starting a Monolithic Dome construction company takes approximately $50,000 – maybe more depending on how much initial operating cash you need.

The Dome Village, offers a structural alternative for homeless people unable or even unwilling to live in traditional shelters or return to the “mainstream” life style.

Safety

Concrete Installation will be committed to conducting business in a manner that protects the health and safety of all employees, customers, and persons living in the community where it operates. To accomplish this, Concrete Installation will ensure that it complies with current Health Administration and Occupational Health and Safety laws and will maintain its operations, procedures, technologies, and policies accordingly. Each employee will have the responsibility to fully comply with established safety rules and to perform work in such a manner to prevent injuries to themselves and others. Concrete Installation is very concerned about job-site safety and plans to set up a comprehensive safety program



Marketing Strategy

Monolithic Dome Construction plans to use a direct sales force, relationship selling, and subcontractors to reach its markets. These channels are most appropriate because of time to market, reduced capital requirements, and fast access to established distribution channels. The overall marketing plan for Monolithic dome service is based on the following fundamentals:

  • The segment of the market(s) planned to reach.
  • Distribution channels planned to be used to reach market segments: television, radio, sales associates, and mail order.
  • Share of the market expected to capture over a fixed period of time.

In addition, Monolithic Dome Construction plans to advertise in magazines, newspapers, and radio.

The table and chart below outline the company’s sales forecast for FY2015-2018. In our sales forecasts, the cost of sales includes only direct labor costs (administrative labor costs are discussed below).

Promotional Campaign

Monolithic Dome Construction is committed to an extensive promotional campaign. This will be done aggressively and on a broad scale. To accomplish initial sales goals, the company will require an effective promotional campaign to accomplish two primary objectives:

  1. Attract customers who will constantly look to Monolithic domes for their housing construction needs.

Attract quality sales personnel who have a desire to be successful.

In addition to standard advertisement practices, Monolithic dome construction will gain considerable recognition through these additional promotional mediums:

  • Press releases sent to major radio stations, newspapers, and magazines.
  • Radio advertising on secondary stations.

Marketing Programs

For the first six months of operation, advertising and promotion is budgeted at approximately $11,000. A fixed amount of sales revenues will go toward the state Monolithic dome advertisement campaign. On an ongoing basis, Monolithic dome feels that it can budget advertising expenses at less than 10% of revenues.

Incentives. As an extra incentive for customers to rememberMonolithic dome construction name, the company plans to distribute coffee mugs, T-shirts, pens, and other advertising specialties with its logo.

Brochures. The objective of brochures is to portrayMonolithic dome construction’ goals and products as an attractive functionality. It is also to show customers how to use the latest in technology as it relates to construction and building services. Concrete Installation will develop three brochures: one to be used to promote sales, one to use to announce the product in a new market, and the other to recruit sales associates.

Management Summary

The company’s management philosophy will be based on responsibility and mutual respect. Monolithic Dome Construction Company will maintain an environment and structure that will encourage productivity and respect for customers and fellow employees.

Monolithic Dome will be responsible to its employees, the men and women who work with the company throughout the state. At Monolithic Dome Construction, everyone will be considered as an individual and the company will respect their dignity and recognize their merit. Employees will be encouraged to have a sense of security and pride in their jobs. Additionally, employees will be free to make suggestions and complaints. The company will afford equal opportunity for employment, development, and advancement for those qualified.

Monolithic Dome Construction Company employees will be committed to:

  • Providing a safe work environment to protect employees, the employees of customers and subcontractors, and the public.
  • Supplying safe products for customers.
  • Continuously improving the company’s safety program to reduce the risk of accidents and occupational illness in a changing work environment.
  • Encouraging employees to participate in accident prevention programs and take personal responsibility for their own and their co-workers’ health and safety.
  • Regulatory compliance and contribution to high safety standards for our industry.
  • Monitoring workplaces, enforcing safe work practices, and communicating the company’s safety performance to employees and other stakeholders.


Making safety a value-added service that the company provides to its customers.

Personnel Plan

Monolithic Dome Construction management is highly experienced and qualified. Chevez Moore leads the management team. Besides the direct labor costs, other labor costs include only Chevez’s assistant and a part-time accountant. The table below outlines Monolithic Dome Construction Company’s personnel plan for FY2015-2018.

Personnel Plan

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Administration

$43,478 $43,478 $52,174

Other

$0 $0 $0

Total People

3 3 3

Total Payroll

$43,478 $43,478 $52,174


Financial Plan

The following sections describe the financials for Monolithic Dome Construction Company

Projected Cash Flow

Projected cash flow statements for FY2015-2018 are provided below.

Pro Forma Cash Flow

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3


Cash Received

Cash from Operations

Cash Sales

$175,000 $262,500 $393,750

Cash from Receivables

$436,500 $743,250 $1,114,875

Subtotal Cash from Operations

$611,500 $1,005,750 $1,508,625

Additional Cash Received

Sales Tax, VAT, HST/GST Received

$0 $0 $0

New Current Borrowing

$0 $0 $0

New Other Liabilities (interest-free)

$0 $0 $0

New Long-term Liabilities

$0 $0 $0

Sales of Other Current Assets

$0 $0 $0

Sales of Long-term Assets

$0 $0 $0

New Investment Received

$0 $0 $0

Subtotal Cash Received

$611,500 $1,005,750 $1,508,625

Expenditures

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Expenditures from Operations


Cash Spending

$43,478 $43,478 $52,174

Bill Payments

$575,604 $783,028 $1,046,580

Subtotal Spent on Operations

$619,082 $826,506 $1,098,754

Additional Cash Spent

Sales Tax, VAT, HST/GST Paid Out

$0 $0 $0

Principal Repayment of Current Borrowing

$0 $0 $0

Other Liabilities Principal Repayment

$0 $0 $0

Long-term Liabilities Principal Repayment

$0 $0 $0

Purchase Other Current Assets

$0 $0 $0

Purchase Long-term Assets

$105,000 $100,000 $100,000

Dividends

$0 $0 $0

Subtotal Cash Spent

$724,082 $926,506 $1,198,754

Net Cash Flow

($112,582) $79,244 $309,871

Cash Balance

$19,418 $98,662 $408,533


Break-even Analysis

During the first year of operations, the break-even sales volume is estimated as shown below.

Break-even Analysis

Monthly Revenue Break-even

$24,706

Assumptions:

Average Percent Variable Cost

64%

Estimated Monthly Fixed Cost

$8,894

Projected Profit and Loss

Monolithic Dome Construction Company is in the early stage of development, thus initial projections have only been made on accounts that are believed to most drive the income statement. 

Pro Forma Profit and Loss

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Sales

$700,000 $1,050,000 $1,575,000

Direct Cost of Sales

$448,000 $558,750 $698,437

Other

$50,000 $50,000 $50,000

Total Cost of Sales

$498,000 $608,750 $748,437

Gross Margin

$202,000 $441,250 $826,563

Gross Margin %

28.86% 42.02% 52.48%

Expenses

Payroll

$43,478 $43,478 $52,174

Sales and Marketing and Other Expenses

$28,600 $77,000 $112,000

Depreciation

$3,600 $5,000 $6,000

Gasoline and oil

$2,030 $4,000 $5,000

Telephone

$1,500 $2,400 $2,400

Utilities

$6,000 $6,000 $6,500

Insurance

$9,000 $9,000 $9,000

Rent

$6,000 $6,500 $7,000

Payroll Taxes

$6,522 $6,522 $7,826

Other

$0 $0 $0

Total Operating Expenses

$106,730 $159,900 $207,900

Profit Before Interest and Taxes

$95,270 $281,350 $618,663

EBITDA

$98,870 $286,350 $624,663

Interest Expense

$0 $0 $0

Taxes Incurred

$23,621 $70,338 $157,243

Net Profit

$71,650 $211,013 $461,419

Net Profit/Sales

10.24% 20.10% 29.30%

Projected Balance Sheet

The table below provides Concrete Installation’s projected balance sheets for 2015-2018.

Pro Forma Balance Sheet

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Assets

Current Assets

Cash

$19,418 $98,662 $408,533

Accounts Receivable

$88,500 $132,750 $199,125

Inventory

$42,240 $52,682 $65,853

Other Current Assets

$30,000 $30,000 $30,000

Total Current Assets

$180,158 $314,094 $703,510

Long-term Assets

Long-term Assets

$125,000 $225,000 $325,000

Accumulated Depreciation

$3,600 $8,600 $14,600

Total Long-term Assets

$121,400 $216,400 $310,400

Total Assets

$301,558 $530,494 $1,013,910

Liabilities and Capital

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Current Liabilities

Accounts Payable

$47,908 $65,832 $87,828

Current Borrowing

$0 $0 $0

Other Current Liabilities

$0 $0 $0

Subtotal Current Liabilities

$47,908 $65,832 $87,828

Long-term Liabilities

$0 $0 $0

Total Liabilities

$47,908 $65,832 $87,828

Paid-in Capital

$215,000 $215,000 $215,000

Retained Earnings

($33,000) $38,650 $249,663

Earnings

$71,650 $211,013 $461,419

Total Capital

$253,650 $464,663 $926,082

Total Liabilities and Capital

$301,558 $530,494 $1,013,910

Net Worth

$253,650 $464,663 $926,082

Business Ratios

The following table presents important ratios from the concrete work industry, as determined by the Standard Industry Classification (SIC) Index code 1771.

Ratio Analysis

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Industry Profile

Sales Growth

0.00% 50.00% 50.00% 7.50%

Percent of Total Assets

Accounts Receivable

29.35% 25.02% 19.64% 30.90%

Inventory

14.01% 9.93% 6.49% 6.30%

Other Current Assets

9.95% 5.66% 2.96% 29.80%

Total Current Assets

59.74% 59.21% 69.39% 67.00%

Long-term Assets

40.26% 40.79% 30.61% 33.00%

Total Assets

100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%

Current Liabilities

15.89% 12.41% 8.66% 43.50%

Long-term Liabilities

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 14.10%

Total Liabilities

15.89% 12.41% 8.66% 57.60%

Net Worth

84.11% 87.59% 91.34% 42.40%

Percent of Sales

Sales

100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 100.00%

Gross Margin

28.86% 42.02% 52.48% 29.40%

Selling, General & Administrative Expenses

18.65% 21.93% 23.02% 15.50%

Advertising Expenses

3.29% 6.67% 6.35% 0.30%

Profit Before Interest and Taxes

13.61% 26.80% 39.28% 2.40%

Main Ratios

Current

3.76 4.77 8.01 1.55

Quick

2.88 3.97 7.26 1.17

Total Debt to Total Assets

15.89% 12.41% 8.66% 57.60%

Pre-tax Return on Net Worth

37.56% 60.55% 66.80% 6.50%

Pre-tax Return on Assets

31.59% 53.04% 61.02% 15.40%

Additional Ratios

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Net Profit Margin

10.24% 20.10% 29.30%

n.a

Return on Equity

28.25% 45.41% 49.82%

n.a

Activity Ratios

Accounts Receivable Turnover

5.93 5.93 5.93

n.a

Collection Days

57 51 51

n.a

Inventory Turnover

10.91 11.77 11.78

n.a

Accounts Payable Turnover

13.01 12.17 12.17

n.a

Payment Days

27 26 26

n.a

Total Asset Turnover

2.32 1.98 1.55

n.a

Debt Ratios

Debt to Net Worth

0.19 0.14 0.09

n.a

Current Liab. to Liab.

1.00 1.00 1.00

n.a

Liquidity Ratios

Net Working Capital

$132,250 $248,263 $615,682

n.a

Interest Coverage

0.00 0.00 0.00

n.a

Additional Ratios

Assets to Sales

0.43 0.51 0.64

n.a

Current Debt/Total Assets

16% 12% 9%

n.a

Acid Test

1.03 1.95 4.99

n.a

Sales/Net Worth

2.76 2.26 1.70

n.a

Dividend Payout

0.00 0.00 0.00

n.a

Start-up Summary

Transitional Housing/Shelthers will require the following real property and equipment for the

start-up phase.

  • Assorted furniture, furnishings, and appliances for the different rooms.
  • Seven desk/chairs, computers, and additional accessories.
  • A computer server, two laser printers, broadband Internet connection.
  • Fax machine and copier.
  • Several file cabinets and shelving units.
  • Paper shredder.


Start-up Requirements

Start-up Expenses

Legal

$3,000

Stationery etc.

$500

Brochures

$500

Other

$0

Total Start-up Expenses

$4,000

Start-up Assets

Cash Required

$18,000

Other Current Assets

$23,000

Long-term Assets

$0

Total Assets

$41,000

Total Requirements

$45,000


Start-up Funding

Start-up Expenses to Fund

$4,000

Start-up Assets to Fund

$41,000

Total Funding Required

$45,000

Assets

Non-cash Assets from Start-up

$23,000

Cash Requirements from Start-up

$18,000

Additional Cash Raised

$0

Cash Balance on Starting Date

$18,000

Total Assets

$41,000

Liabilities and Capital

Liabilities

Current Borrowing

$0

Long-term Liabilities

$0

Accounts Payable (Outstanding Bills)

$0

Other Current Liabilities (interest-free)

$0

Total Liabilities

$0

Capital

Planned Investment

Private Donation

$45,000

Investor 2

$0

Other

$0

Additional Investment Requirement

$0

Total Planned Investment

$45,000

Loss at Start-up (Start-up Expenses)

($4,000)

Total Capital

$41,000

Total Capital and Liabilities

$41,000

Total Funding

$45,000


Market Analysis

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Potential Customers

Growth

CAGR

Under 30 years old

9% 165,454 180,345 196,576 214,268 233,552 9.00%

30 years or older

8% 158,745 171,445 185,161 199,974 215,972 8.00%

Total

8.51% 324,199 351,790 381,737 414,242 449,524 8.51%


Management Summary

Monolithic Dome Construction Company management consists of Chevez Moore,and will concentrate on client contacts and bidding along with overall management of the company. Others will be the company’s General Project Manager, coordinating all project management and concentrating on cost controls, suppliers, day-to-day project supervision, labor relations, etc. The management team will be our office manager, handling client satisfaction,invoicing, permitting, and general book keeping. Most of our labor needs will be met through unemployment and residential, local labor markets and a nationwidepermanate labor company.

The company is planning to expand it personnel to add a number of job superintendents as soon as the number of projects increases. These superintendents will have the following duties:

  • Direct supervision of all work at the job site.
  • Quality control.
  • Scheduling construction and material deliveries.
  • Verifying and insuring that all work is done in accordance with plans.
  • Insuring that all work is performed in accordance with all OSHA guidelines.

In addition, as business increases, we will hire additional job superintendents and project managers as needed.

Personnel Plan

Estimate Bsaed per state

Our personnel expansion will be focused on the number of temporary laborers we will employ. The table below gives our estimate of labor costs.

Personnel Plan

2015 2016 2017

Chevez Moore, CEO

$42,000 $42,000 $42,000

General Project Manager

$42,000 $42,000 $42,000

Office Manager

$24,000 $24,000 $24,000

Job Supervisor

$0 $0 $14,400

employees

$72,000 $72,000 $90,000

Total People

9 9 12

Total Payroll

$180,000 $180,000 $212,400

Financial Plan

The following sections are the financial projections for Monolithic Dome Construction for the next three years. These tables represent a conservative estimate of revenues, expenses, and growth. We do not anticipate a significant increase in profits until 2016, as we will need time to penetrate our new market. We plan on basing dividend payouts on overall performance and health of the company and may decide to retain such earnings for future growth.

Important Assumptions

The following is our estimate of our financial assumptions based on previous experience.

General Assumptions

2004 2015 2016

Plan Month

1

2

3

Current Interest Rate

10.00% 10.00% 10.00%

Long-term Interest Rate

10.00% 10.00% 10.00%

Tax Rate

30.00% 30.00% 30.00%

Other

0 0 0



Break-even Analysis

Our break even analysis is based on average monthly fixed costs, which in turn, is based on historical figures, plus our average price per product. This estimate is also based on experience, however because of our wide range of potential projects, its accuracy lessens. The average variable costs are based on industry standards.


Break-even Analysis

Monthly Revenue Break-even

$64,451

Assumptions:

Average Percent Variable Cost

72%

Estimated Monthly Fixed Cost

$18,043

Projected Profit and Loss

The following is our best estimate of future revenues and costs, based on current market trends, past performance, and perceived revenue of our new target market. Readers will note that overall profits are quite low for 20011-20013. This is because we estimate we will be paying higher labor costs immediately and the overall revenues will lag somewhat. We will also have fewer initial clients as we attempt to exert our presence in the commercial contracting market. However, we have anticipated this by buffering ourselves with sufficient cash reserves, and we estimate a significant increase in profitability within five years.


Start-up Requirements

Start-up Expenses

Legal

$500

Stationery etc.

$100

Brochures

$500

Consultants

$1,000


Insurance

$15,000

Rent

$500

Expensed equipment

$14,000

Other

$1,400

Total Start-up Expenses

$33,000

Start-up Assets

Cash Required

$132,000

Start-up Inventory

$0

Other Current Assets

$30,000

Long-term Assets

$20,000

Total Assets

$182,000

Total Requirements

$215,000


start-up Funding

Start-up Expenses to Fund

$33,000

Start-up Assets to Fund

$182,000

Total Funding Required

$215,000

Assets

Non-cash Assets from Start-up

$50,000

Cash Requirements from Start-up

$132,000

Additional Cash Raised

$0

Cash Balance on Starting Date

$132,000

Total Assets

$182,000

Liabilities and Capital

Liabilities

Current Borrowing

$0


Long-term Liabilities

$0

Accounts Payable (Outstanding Bills)

$0

Other Current Liabilities (interest-free)

$0

Total Liabilities

$0

Capital

Planned Investment

Barry Newman

$15,000

Investor

$200,000

Additional Investment Requirement

$0

Total Planned Investment

$215,000

Loss at Start-up (Start-up Expenses)

($33,000)


Total Capital

$182,000

Total Capital and Liabilities

$182,000

Total Funding

$215,000





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